The Team

Professor Stephen Brewster

Professor Stephen Brewster

Website - Google Scholar

..is Professor of HCI at Glasgow. He leads the research into multimodal interaction within the Glasgow Interactive Systems (GIST) Section. He has a world leading reputation in designing novel forms of multimodal interaction, with a focus on haptics and audio. He is also coordinator of the H2020 FETOpen Levitate project (https://www.levitateproject.org). He has had research funded by many companies including: Nokia, Samsung, HP, Immersion, Freescale, Bang & Olufsen and Microsoft. He has over 400 publications in top international conferences and journals and has 20 best paper awards. His work has ~18,000 citations and he has an H-Index of 70. He is a member of the ACM SIGCHI Academy, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and an ACM Distinguished Speaker.

Dr Mark McGill

Dr Mark McGill - 7 posts

Website - Google Scholar

...is a Lecturer in GIST. With 13 publications and 2 Best Paper awards, he has pioneered research into VR HMD usability, VR for media consumption [9], movement and interaction under gain in VR, virtual work-spaces and passenger VR usage in transportation. He has had three successful EPSRC IAA grants and has also conducted XR research funded by Logitech (under NDA).

Professor Frank Pollick

Professor Frank Pollick

Website - Google Scholar

...is a Professor of Psychology at Glasgow and an international expert in the brain mechanisms underlying human perception and cognition. He is known for his work on motion and the perception of complex, dynamic events as well as the use of brain imaging technology to understand how the brain processes these events. His research has been funded by the EPSRC, ESRC, AHRC, EU, British Academy and the US charity Autism Speaks. He is co-author of a Cognitive Psychology textbook published by McGraw-Hill. He has received 3 Best Paper awards, most recently at the prestigious 2016 ACM SIGIR conference. He has over 100 papers in psychology, engineering and neuroscience journals. This work has received ~4,500 citations and he has an H-index of 30 (Google Scholar, July 2018). Pollick has worked on theoretical issues of how the sight and sounds of human actions are processed. This includes work on the visual cues available from movement and the use of fMRI to study brain mechanisms involved in processing this information for both precisely controlled and naturalistic stimuli.

Dr Julie Williamson

Dr Julie Williamson

Website - Google Scholar

...is a Lecturer in Human Computer Interaction in GIST at the University of Glasgow. She has been the PI or Co-I on funded research worth over £750K exploring unusual display technologies, including as PI on the EPSRC SIPS Project (EP/M00 2675/1) and Co-I on the H2020 FET Open Levitate Project (737087). Her PhD work focused on the social acceptability of multimodal interaction, which she tested on the streets of Glasgow and Bangalore. She was the first to study this area and is a world-leader in the topic. She is an inaugural member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Future of Computing Academy, a prestigious group of early career computing professionals from around the world working to address challenges in computing across research, society, and professional practice. She has over 20 peer reviewed publications in high-ranking conferences such as ACM CHI and ACM UbiComp, with over 500 citations and an H-index of 10. She received a Best Paper Award at ACM CHI in 2017 on public evaluation techniques, and has notably researched the social acceptability of passenger VR in-flight.

Gang Li

Gang Li

Website - Google Scholar

Gang grew up in an inland province in China, and in 2007 completed his undergraduate degree in Electronic Information/Communication Engineering at Nanchang Aeronautical University, China. While working on his Bachelor’s of Engineering and for some time after, he became interested in healthcare technologies due to family background. He had been thinking about how people's physiological data can be monitored in a real-time manner and accordingly some targeted interventions can be designed and developed. Intrigued by this, he decided to continue his education at Pusan National University at Busan, South Korea where he completed a Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering in 2010. There he studied how to develop surface electromyography (EMG) sensor system and how to apply it to people's negative emotion recognition from the perspective of the emotional motor system. This research experience made him realized that he was interested in pursuing a career in academia. Eager to see how people's brain works, Gang worked towards his PhD under the mentorship of Wan-Young Chung in the School of Electronic Engineering at the Pukyong National University at the same city, Busan. His research developed a fully wearable and AI-driven neuromodulation system to detect and intervene in driver's drowsiness. Now he is a postdoc research associate at the University of Glasgow. He is designing and developing novel brain monitoring and intervention tools to impact the cognitive and mental health aspects of consumer VR users.

Daniel Pires de Sá Medeiros

Daniel Pires de Sá Medeiros

Website - Google Scholar

... is a Postdoctoral Research Associate on the Viajero Project, University of Glasgow, focusing on the design of novel 3d user interfaces to overcome physical limitations of restricted spaces in different forms of transportation. He obtained his PhD in Information Systems and Computer Engineering from Instituto Superior Técnico, ULisboa and integrated the VIMMI Group at INESC-ID Lisboa. During his Msc in Informatics at PUC-Rio, Brazil he was part of the Virtual Reality and Digital Entertainment Group at Tecgraf/PUC-Rio, with a focus on the development of VR-based novel interfaces for the Oil and Gas industry. Current research interests include Virtual Reality, Human Computer Interaction and 3D User Interfaces.

Laura Bajorunaite

Laura Bajorunaite

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A first year PhD Student within the Multimodal Interaction Group at Glasgow University looking at the social acceptability of mixed reality technologies in public transport settings.